Research

Interesting Facts – how Metallic Taste affects patients (1):

  1. It ranked second only to alopecia (hair loss) as a bothersome side effect of chemotherapy (5)
  2. Quality of life is drastically impaired (5)
  3. It is extremely frustrating and irritating for patients (5)
  4. Over 50% of patients develop a food aversion after chemotherapy (3)(4)
  5. It is estimated that 46% to 77% of patients receiving chemotherapy have changes in taste. (2)
  6. It can last from 1 month to 3 months after chemo treatments.
  7. Nutritional compromise can result in decreased effectiveness and delays of treatment (5)
  8. Only 17% of patients receive information about it before initiating chemotherapy (6)

Chemotherapy drugs that cause Metallic Taste:

Metallic Taste is most often associated with the following chemotherapy drugs:

· 5-FU · Cytoxan · Immunex · Onxal
· 5-Fluorouracil · Denileukin diftitox · Infergen · Onxol
· Abraxane · Doxil · Interferon · Paclitaxel
· Adriamycin · Doxorubicin · Intron A · Paraplatin
· Adrucil · Dtic-Dome · Liposomal doxorubicin · Paxene
· Alferon n · Efudex · Methotrexate · Platinol
· Amethopterin · Emcyt · Mexate · Roferon-A
· Cisplatin · Ergamisol · Mustargen · Rubex
· Clafen · Fluoroplex · Neosar · Taxol
· Comegen · Fluorouracil · Oncovin · Trexall
· Cyclophosphamide · Folex · Ontak · Vincasar PFS

 

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References:

  1. Wasserman, A., (2012). “Management of Chemotherapy-Induced Dysgeusia” University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, http://www.oncolink.org/resources/article.cfm?id=1047&aid=2017
  2. Bernhardson, B-M., Tishelman, C., & Rutquist, L.E. (2008). Self-reported taste and smell changes during during cancer chemotherapy. Supportive Care in Cancer, 16, 275-283. Doi: 10.107/x00520-007-0319-7 http://www.jpsmjournal.com/article/S0885-3924(07)00341-7/abstract
  3. Berteretche, M.V., Dalix, A.M., Cesar d’Ornano, A.M., Bellisle, F., Khayat, D., & Faurion, A. (2004). Decreased taste sensitivity in cancer patients under chemotherapy. Supportive Care in Cancer, 12, 1571-576. Doi: 1007/s00520-004-0589-2 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2858711/
  4. Strasser, F., Demmer, R., Bohme, C. Schmitz, S-F.H., Thuerliman, B., Cerney, T., & Gillessen, S. (2008). Prevention of docetaxel- or paclitaxel- associated taste alterations in cancer patients with oral glutamine: A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study. The Oncologist, 13, 337-346. Doi: 1634/theoncologist.2007-0217 http://theoncologist.alphamedpress.org/content/13/3/337.abstract
  5. Bernhardson, B-M., Tishelman, C., & Rutquist, L.E. (2007). Chemosensory changes experienced by patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy: A qualitative interview study. Journal of Pain and Management, 34, 403-411. Doi: 10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2006.12.010 http://www.jpsmjournal.com/article/S0885-3924(07)00341-7/pdf
  6. Rehwaldt, M., Wickman, R., Purl, S., Tariman, J., Blendowski, C., Shott, S., & Lappe, M. (2009). Self-care strategies to cope with taste changes after chemotherapy. Oncology Nursing Forum, 36, E 47-56. Doi: 1188/09.ONF.E47-E56 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19273394